Employment Through Heavy Bleeding – Work-at-Home Options

Employment Through Heavy Bleeding – Work-at-Home Options 2560 1707 Fibroidsconnect.com

Employment Through Heavy Bleeding – Work-at-Home Options

Work… that certainly is a topic that has taken a beating through the past few months. Everyone has had their fair share of difficulties, but for women managing through the heavy bleeding, chronic pain and multiple visits to doctors’ offices that can accompany uterine fibroids, maintaining employment is even more of a challenge.

Strategies for managing heavy bleeding in the workplace are enough for many women, but for those still having troubles, hope is not lost. Some change of direction may be required, but with more and more people in the European Union working from home, you have a number of options. Which is best for you? Only you can say, but the options are plentiful. And it’s always better to have options.

Take your current job home.

The least risky and potentially easiest adjustment is to take your current job home with you. If this is a first choice, put together a proposal for your boss. List all the company stands to gain by this arrangement, the first one being that YOU will still be working for them! Add to that less need for office space and less time spent chit-chatting at the water cooler, as well as more flexibility with work hours (if that offer is on the table) and you may have a good enough argument, especially given that the last few months have taught many workplaces that virtual presence is sufficient.

Work virtually for an outsourcing company.

Start up a spreadsheet and Google your heart out. Find legitimate options – virtual assistant work can be performed from home, often on a flexible schedule. Accounting, some finance jobs, database management, content marketing and social media – all of these are valid work-from-home options, and these employment options are often offered via an outsourcing company. There are a lot of scams out there for “work from home”, but legitimate ways of making a living abound. Networking is the name of the game. Connect to others in your field, family and community to get up-to-the-minute news on the ins and outs, and be sure to read all the fine print. How and when will you get paid by the outsourcing company? Who takes care of issues concerning taxes and other legal pay slip items? These are all issues that need to be hammered out before signing on the dotted (virtual) line.

Open your own company.

Setting out on your own, entirely independently, is potentially extremely rewarding. However, this option also carries the highest risk, as well as involving business skills that you may need to develop. Entrepreneurs need to not only do the work at hand, but also find clients, look after bookkeeping, advertise and take care of collections. This isn’t everyone’s cup of tea, so it requires careful consultations with those who have “been there” as well as consideration of all factors involved. Check out your local small business resources, insofar as getting set up and growth are concerned. They are an invaluable resource.

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Another vital issue for which those who wish to work at home must carefully prepare is the work environment. Ignoring issues involved in setting up a functional workspace and daily structure is a surefire recipe for failure. Aiming for success must therefore include research and preparation in these fields, as well as the more obvious issues mentioned above.

Establish a workspace.

Making sure your daily workspace is functional is key. Each room of living space has its own advantages and disadvantages. Will you need to be physically receiving clients into your home? What about background noise on phone calls? A nearly endless list of factors needs to be taken into account to make this work.

Set a daily schedule.

If the employer dictates when you’re at your desk, as in between the hours of X and Y, then your only issues here are to figure out a way to forget about piles of laundry and dishes and the shopping lists waiting to be written in order to sit down and do the work when it’s demanded. If you’re afforded more flexibility, a potential pitfall develops. For those who find it difficult to compartmentalize their time, a die-hard schedule might be the way to start. Plan out and account for every quarter hour during the day to make sure the work, which must be prioritized, is getting done. Remember, work-at-home still means WORK.

Wishing all women, everywhere, success in all their endeavors! And even more than triumphing workplace conundrums, we wish true health and comfort and the fulfillment of your dreams.